Welcome!

@DevOpsSummit Authors: Yeshim Deniz, Liz McMillan, Pat Romanski, Elizabeth White, Flint Brenton

Related Topics: @CloudExpo, Microservices Expo, Microsoft Cloud, Containers Expo Blog, @DXWorldExpo, @DevOpsSummit

@CloudExpo: Article

CiRBA’s Automated Capacity Control Now Supports Microsoft Hyper-V

This new capability is a key addition to CiRBA’s already strong platform support

CiRBA has announced the availability of CiRBA Version 8. With this release, CiRBA adds support for Microsoft® Hyper-V® to its award-winning Control Console, which enables organizations to maximize efficiency and minimize risk in virtual and cloud infrastructure. This new capability is a key addition to CiRBA’s already strong platform support, which includes VMware® ESX®, IBM® PowerVM®, and Red Hat® Enterprise Virtualization.

“The shift toward cloud is placing less emphasis on the specific hypervisor technology, and more on the capabilities it provides,” said Andrew Hillier, CTO and co-Founder of CiRBA. “Having a scientific way to make hosting decisions across all hypervisors and hosting platforms really opens up the playing field, and allows organizations to focus on the bigger picture of enterprise-level supply and demand.”

Also now shipping in Version 8 is CiRBA’s new Reservation Console, announced last fall, which automates the entire process of selecting the optimal hosting environment for new workloads and reserving compute and storage capacity. The Reservation Console combines with CiRBA’s cross-platform support to enable CiRBA customers to automate “fit for purpose” placements for new workloads across multi-hypervisor, multi-SLA, multi-site virtual and cloud environments.

Concerns about vendor lock-in and hypervisor costs are driving more and more organizations toward multi-hypervisor adoption. In fact, according to research by Torsten Volk of EMA, 82% of organizations plan to adopt more than one hypervisor.

Multi-hypervisor adoption, particularly within private clouds, can present a significant management challenge for organizations in determining which workloads should be hosted on each respective platform. In order to help combat the complexity, organizations need to change how they make workload placement decisions.

“We currently leverage CiRBA from a cross-platform capacity control perspective. As we seek to automate and more closely balance infrastructure supply with the demands of the business, the capabilities found in CiRBA Version 8, and specifically coverage of even more hypervisor technologies, will be a welcome addition,” said Matt McCarter, server engineering lead of McKesson Corporation.

CiRBA’s Hyper-V® support spans the entire scope of CiRBA functionality. Within the Control Console, organizations use it to achieve daily operational control over VM placements, and create predictive, forward looking views incorporating capacity reservations for new workloads providing unmatched accuracy in forecasting requirements. Within the new Reservation Console, the addition of Hyper-V® can have a significant impact on workload routing decisions, and clearly exposes the relative advantages of different hypervisors from a cost and fit for purpose perspective.

“Organizations are keeping their options open, and our new release removes a lot of the barriers that would prevent multiple hypervisors and cloud technologies from being adopted,” continued Hillier. “We are very excited to bring this new level of operational control and automation to Hyper-V® infrastructure, making it an even more viable option.”

About CiRBA Inc.
CiRBA is the gold standard for Automated Capacity Control software in virtual and cloud infrastructure. Only CiRBA’s policy-based engine provides the precision required to confidently transform server infrastructure, automatically control VM placements, and predict future capacity requirements. Global 2000 customers using CiRBA see 40-70% improvements in infrastructure efficiency through dramatically higher VM density and safer automated operations.

For more information, visit www.cirba.com or follow us on Twitter @CiRBA.

More Stories By Liz McMillan

News Desk compiles and publishes breaking news stories, press releases and latest news articles as they happen.

@DevOpsSummit Stories
Andi Mann, Chief Technology Advocate at Splunk, is an accomplished digital business executive with extensive global expertise as a strategist, technologist, innovator, marketer, and communicator. For over 30 years across five continents, he has built success with Fortune 500 corporations, vendors, governments, and as a leading research analyst and consultant.
In his keynote at 18th Cloud Expo, Andrew Keys, Co-Founder of ConsenSys Enterprise, provided an overview of the evolution of the Internet and the Database and the future of their combination – the Blockchain. Andrew Keys is Co-Founder of ConsenSys Enterprise. He comes to ConsenSys Enterprise with capital markets, technology and entrepreneurial experience. Previously, he worked for UBS investment bank in equities analysis. Later, he was responsible for the creation and distribution of life settlement products to hedge funds and investment banks. After, he co-founded a revenue cycle management company where he learned about Bitcoin and eventually Ethereum.
For far too long technology teams have lived in siloes. Not only physical siloes, but cultural siloes pushed by competing objectives. This includes informational siloes where business users require one set of data and tech teams require different data. DevOps intends to bridge these gaps to make tech driven operations more aligned and efficient.
For organizations that have amassed large sums of software complexity, taking a microservices approach is the first step toward DevOps and continuous improvement / development. Integrating system-level analysis with microservices makes it easier to change and add functionality to applications at any time without the increase of risk. Before you start big transformation projects or a cloud migration, make sure these changes won’t take down your entire organization.
It is ironic, but perhaps not unexpected, that many organizations who want the benefits of using an Agile approach to deliver software use a waterfall approach to adopting Agile practices: they form plans, they set milestones, and they measure progress by how many teams they have engaged. Old habits die hard, but like most waterfall software projects, most waterfall-style Agile adoption efforts fail to produce the results desired. The problem is that to get the results they want, they have to change their culture and cultures are very hard to change. To paraphrase Peter Drucker, "culture eats Agile for breakfast." Successful approaches are opportunistic and leverage the power of self-organization to achieve lasting change.