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DevOps Journal Authors: Andreas Grabner, Pat Romanski, Mike Kavis, Roger Strukhoff, Elizabeth White

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SDN Journal: Blog Feed Post

Totally Unscientific and Informal SDN Adoption Poll Results

Very informal and totally unscientific results

During a session at Gartner Data Center 2013 (Software Defined Networking? Not a Question of If, A Matter of When and How) the question of SDN adoption was asked by speakers Joe Skorupa and Andrew Lerner of an approximately 100 person audience. These are the (very informal and totally unscientific results).

gartnerdc-whatis-sdn-2013

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More Stories By Lori MacVittie

Lori MacVittie is responsible for education and evangelism of application services available across F5’s entire product suite. Her role includes authorship of technical materials and participation in a number of community-based forums and industry standards organizations, among other efforts. MacVittie has extensive programming experience as an application architect, as well as network and systems development and administration expertise. Prior to joining F5, MacVittie was an award-winning Senior Technology Editor at Network Computing Magazine, where she conducted product research and evaluation focused on integration with application and network architectures, and authored articles on a variety of topics aimed at IT professionals. Her most recent area of focus included SOA-related products and architectures. She holds a B.S. in Information and Computing Science from the University of Wisconsin at Green Bay, and an M.S. in Computer Science from Nova Southeastern University.

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