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JFrog Advances Software Development with World's First High-Availability Binary Repository Manager

Launches Artifactory with HA Capabilities to Solve DevOps Redundancy Pains


SANTA CLARA, Calif., Jan. 28, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- JFrog, the company that's leading the way software is built and distributed, today announced the availability of Artifactory version 3.1, the industry's first and only Binary Repository with High-Availability (HA) capabilities. This latest version of JFrog's flagship product for software development prevents service disruptions, ensures smooth maintenance, and provides faster response times by enabling multiple Artifactory servers to run at once using the same data.

(Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140128/NE53630-INFO )

(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140128/NE53630LOGO )

Ideal for minimizing server downtime, Artifactory 3.1 supports a High-Availability network configuration with a cluster of two or more Artifactory servers on the same local area network (LAN). This means that if one server goes down, the network will continue to run seamlessly, undisrupted.

Benefits of the Artifactory 3.1 High-Availability offering include:

  • Maximized Uptime: there is no single-point-of-failure and a system can operate as long as at least one of the Artifactory server nodes is operational, maximizing uptime to levels of up to 99.999% availability. 
  • Management of Heavy Loads: by supporting load balancing on multiple Artifactory server nodes, developers can leverage parallel read-write request processing and support heavier load bursts than ever before, with no compromise to performance.
  • Minimized Maintenance Downtime: with architecture including multiple Artifactory servers, developers can perform most maintenance tasks with zero system downtime, keeping users happy and unaffected.

"Our team is thrilled to bring High-Availability to the Continuous Integration space," said Shlomi Ben-Haim, CEO and co-founder of JFrog. "Artifactory is already part of our customers' production environments, and this is huge news for companies that can't afford to suffer server downtime and costly service disruptions. Users can perform more efficiently, even at high loads, and the clustered servers ensure builds and production deployments won't fail."

In addition to the HA capabilities, Artifactory 3.1 introduces several key updates, including a new API for per-file download statistics and improved Black Duck Code Center integration for open source governance.

The High-Availability version of Artifactory is available now within the Artifactory Pro Enterprise Value Pack, and users can get a free trial license at www.jfrog.com. For more information on JFrog's suite of services, please visit jfrog.com and follow on Twitter at @jfrog and @bintray.

About JFrog:
Based in Israel and California and founded by longtime field-experts, JFrog is the creator of Artifactory and Bintray; the company that provided the market with the first Binary Repository solution and software distribution social platform. Through its flagship product Artifactory, JFrog has changed the way developers and DevOps team store and manage binary code, allowing for complete control over the full software release flow. JFrog continues to set the software industry standard with Bintray, today's leading software distribution platform which offers a developer centric, social platform for storage and distribution of software libraries.

JFrog's end-to-end solution—from Development to Distribution—is a vital part of a faster, more efficient application development and release processes that leads today's Continuous Integration and Deployment space.


SOURCE JFrog

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