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@DevOpsSummit Authors: Pat Romanski, Liz McMillan, Yeshim Deniz, Elizabeth White, SmartBear Blog

Related Topics: WebRTC Summit, Java IoT, Open Source Cloud, @CloudExpo, @DXWorldExpo, SDN Journal

WebRTC Summit: Article

2nd WebRTC Summit Registration Now Open

Register by February 7 and save $500

Register for 2nd WebRTC Summit by February 7 and Save $500!

Registration is now open for "2nd International WebRTC Summit," being held June 10-12, 2014, at the Javits Center in New York City, New York.

  • $495 (Expires February 7, 2014)
  • $595 (Expires February 28, 2014)
  • $695 (Expires March 31, 2014)
  • $795 (Expires April 30, 2014)
  • $895 (Expires May 31, 2014)

WebRTC (Web Real-Time Communication) is an open source project supported by Google, Mozilla and Opera that aims to enable browser-to-browser applications for voice calling, video chat, and P2P file sharing without plugins. Its mission is "To enable rich, high quality, RTC applications to be developed in the browser via simple JavaScript APIs and HTML5."

Delegates will receive full conference access for three days to all conference sessions at WebRTC Summit June 10-12. Registration includes: Welcome Reception on Day 1, refreshment breaks, and access to all conference sessions including all technical sessions, the exhibit floor, keynotes, vendor technology presentations, and SYS-CON.TV Power Panels.

Register for 2nd WebRTC Summit by February 7 and Save $500!

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