Welcome!

@DevOpsSummit Authors: Pat Romanski, Elizabeth White, Liz McMillan, Yeshim Deniz, Zakia Bouachraoui

Related Topics: @DevOpsSummit, Java IoT, Microsoft Cloud, Containers Expo Blog, SDN Journal

@DevOpsSummit: Blog Post

Will DevOps Become the Norm? By @Skytap | @DevOpsSummit [#DevOps]

Your Customers Sure Hope So

Will DevOps Become the Norm?

All prognosticators, even us who simply roll out a single annual list, hope for two things: one, that your predictions get a lot of traction and shares across the industry, and two, that you end up actually being correct.

Anil Batra’s list of 2014 predictions has turned a lot of heads, largely due to the fact that he led off with such a bold one. “DevOps teams become the norm, not the exception.” While you would imagine that the DevOps faithful and its believers would be the biggest fans of this coming true this year, I would argue that it’s software customers who have received a product from DevOps-practicing teams that are waving the biggest flag.

Batra labels DevOps as once being only an “agile offshoot” which is hard to hard to believe that it once existed only as such, even in its still-young age, and this is credited to its meteoric rise in popularity—especially in the enterprise. Batra then plainly states, “In 2014, expect DevOps teams to sprout up in all large enterprises.”

“All” is an awfully large number; but at the end of the year, will Batra be correct?

Another area of software technology on an equally impressive rise, and one that many also enjoy predicting upon, is cloud computing and the emergence of “application-centric operations. ” The connection and interdependence of all of these practices cannot be overstated.

While DevOps, cloud computing, and even agile, can all stand alone, it’s their dramatic effectiveness when combined that give Batra’s prediction seriously favorable odds. All three strive for (and achieve) easier collaboration, continuous integration, and rapidly produced software and services with fewer defects—the latter being what all customers expect from every software provider.

Once thought to work best only on smaller projects, agile has seen it’s own share of success at the enterprise level, but ReadWriteWeb’s Matt Asay points out that it’s DevOps that is “reshaping” the enterprise industry. What is it about DevOps that is fueling it’s growth in what Asay calls, “the stodgy old enterprise?” His answer:

Quite simply, because it works. Because IT operations and development are better in collaboration than in competition. As the survey uncovered, high-performing, DevOps-savvy organizations deploy code 30 times faster with 50% fewer failures. And, strikingly, the longer DevOps practices are followed within an organization, the lower that organization's app failure rate and the faster its recovery from failure.

Any software company trying to survive in today’s hyper-competitive market knows that delivering better software faster is the number one key to success. With DevOps’ short (but that will change) track record, Batra’s prediction that “all” enterprises will have DevOps teams by the end of the year isn’t that hard to believe.

My prediction? Enterprises that fail to incorporate DevOps into their development practices will experience failure just as quickly as those who embrace DevOps experience success. And as that failure mounts, enterprises will either make a change, or simply cease to exist—making Batra’s “all” that much closer to fruition.

Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By Skytap Blog

Author: Noel Wurst is the managing content editor at Skytap. Skytap provides SaaS-based dev/test environments to the enterprise. Skytap solution removes the inefficiencies and constraints that companies have within their software development lifecycle. As a result, customers release better software faster. In this blog, we publish engaging, thought provoking stories that revolve around agile enterprise applications and cloud-based development and testing.

@DevOpsSummit Stories
In an era of historic innovation fueled by unprecedented access to data and technology, the low cost and risk of entering new markets has leveled the playing field for business. Today, any ambitious innovator can easily introduce a new application or product that can reinvent business models and transform the client experience. In their Day 2 Keynote at 19th Cloud Expo, Mercer Rowe, IBM Vice President of Strategic Alliances, and Raejeanne Skillern, Intel Vice President of Data Center Group and GM, discussed how clients in this new era of innovation can apply data, technology, plus human ingenuity to springboard to advance new business value and opportunities.
Discussions of cloud computing have evolved in recent years from a focus on specific types of cloud, to a world of hybrid cloud, and to a world dominated by the APIs that make today's multi-cloud environments and hybrid clouds possible. In this Power Panel at 17th Cloud Expo, moderated by Conference Chair Roger Strukhoff, panelists addressed the importance of customers being able to use the specific technologies they need, through environments and ecosystems that expose their APIs to make true change and transformation possible.
With more than 30 Kubernetes solutions in the marketplace, it's tempting to think Kubernetes and the vendor ecosystem has solved the problem of operationalizing containers at scale or of automatically managing the elasticity of the underlying infrastructure that these solutions need to be truly scalable. Far from it. There are at least six major pain points that companies experience when they try to deploy and run Kubernetes in their complex environments. In this presentation, the speaker will detail these pain points and explain how cloud can address them.
The current age of digital transformation means that IT organizations must adapt their toolset to cover all digital experiences, beyond just the end users’. Today’s businesses can no longer focus solely on the digital interactions they manage with employees or customers; they must now contend with non-traditional factors. Whether it's the power of brand to make or break a company, the need to monitor across all locations 24/7, or the ability to proactively resolve issues, companies must adapt to the new world.
In his session at 20th Cloud Expo, Scott Davis, CTO of Embotics, discussed how automation can provide the dynamic management required to cost-effectively deliver microservices and container solutions at scale. He also discussed how flexible automation is the key to effectively bridging and seamlessly coordinating both IT and developer needs for component orchestration across disparate clouds – an increasingly important requirement at today’s multi-cloud enterprise.