Welcome!

@DevOpsSummit Authors: Jason Bloomberg, Pat Romanski, Yeshim Deniz, Elizabeth White, Liz McMillan

Related Topics: @DevOpsSummit, Java IoT, Microsoft Cloud, Containers Expo Blog, SDN Journal

@DevOpsSummit: Blog Post

Will DevOps Become the Norm? By @Skytap | @DevOpsSummit [#DevOps]

Your Customers Sure Hope So

Will DevOps Become the Norm?

All prognosticators, even us who simply roll out a single annual list, hope for two things: one, that your predictions get a lot of traction and shares across the industry, and two, that you end up actually being correct.

Anil Batra’s list of 2014 predictions has turned a lot of heads, largely due to the fact that he led off with such a bold one. “DevOps teams become the norm, not the exception.” While you would imagine that the DevOps faithful and its believers would be the biggest fans of this coming true this year, I would argue that it’s software customers who have received a product from DevOps-practicing teams that are waving the biggest flag.

Batra labels DevOps as once being only an “agile offshoot” which is hard to hard to believe that it once existed only as such, even in its still-young age, and this is credited to its meteoric rise in popularity—especially in the enterprise. Batra then plainly states, “In 2014, expect DevOps teams to sprout up in all large enterprises.”

“All” is an awfully large number; but at the end of the year, will Batra be correct?

Another area of software technology on an equally impressive rise, and one that many also enjoy predicting upon, is cloud computing and the emergence of “application-centric operations. ” The connection and interdependence of all of these practices cannot be overstated.

While DevOps, cloud computing, and even agile, can all stand alone, it’s their dramatic effectiveness when combined that give Batra’s prediction seriously favorable odds. All three strive for (and achieve) easier collaboration, continuous integration, and rapidly produced software and services with fewer defects—the latter being what all customers expect from every software provider.

Once thought to work best only on smaller projects, agile has seen it’s own share of success at the enterprise level, but ReadWriteWeb’s Matt Asay points out that it’s DevOps that is “reshaping” the enterprise industry. What is it about DevOps that is fueling it’s growth in what Asay calls, “the stodgy old enterprise?” His answer:

Quite simply, because it works. Because IT operations and development are better in collaboration than in competition. As the survey uncovered, high-performing, DevOps-savvy organizations deploy code 30 times faster with 50% fewer failures. And, strikingly, the longer DevOps practices are followed within an organization, the lower that organization's app failure rate and the faster its recovery from failure.

Any software company trying to survive in today’s hyper-competitive market knows that delivering better software faster is the number one key to success. With DevOps’ short (but that will change) track record, Batra’s prediction that “all” enterprises will have DevOps teams by the end of the year isn’t that hard to believe.

My prediction? Enterprises that fail to incorporate DevOps into their development practices will experience failure just as quickly as those who embrace DevOps experience success. And as that failure mounts, enterprises will either make a change, or simply cease to exist—making Batra’s “all” that much closer to fruition.

Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By Skytap Blog

Author: Noel Wurst is the managing content editor at Skytap. Skytap provides SaaS-based dev/test environments to the enterprise. Skytap solution removes the inefficiencies and constraints that companies have within their software development lifecycle. As a result, customers release better software faster. In this blog, we publish engaging, thought provoking stories that revolve around agile enterprise applications and cloud-based development and testing.

@DevOpsSummit Stories
"Our strategy is to focus on the hyperscale providers - AWS, Azure, and Google. Over the last year we saw that a lot of developers need to learn how to do their job in the cloud and we see this DevOps movement that we are catering to with our content," stated Alessandro Fasan, Head of Global Sales at Cloud Academy, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at 20th Cloud Expo, held June 6-8, 2017, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY.
Andi Mann, Chief Technology Advocate at Splunk, is an accomplished digital business executive with extensive global expertise as a strategist, technologist, innovator, marketer, and communicator. For over 30 years across five continents, he has built success with Fortune 500 corporations, vendors, governments, and as a leading research analyst and consultant.
Hardware virtualization and cloud computing allowed us to increase resource utilization and increase our flexibility to respond to business demand. Docker Containers are the next quantum leap - Are they?! Databases always represented an additional set of challenges unique to running workloads requiring a maximum of I/O, network, CPU resources combined with data locality.
The current age of digital transformation means that IT organizations must adapt their toolset to cover all digital experiences, beyond just the end users’. Today’s businesses can no longer focus solely on the digital interactions they manage with employees or customers; they must now contend with non-traditional factors. Whether it's the power of brand to make or break a company, the need to monitor across all locations 24/7, or the ability to proactively resolve issues, companies must adapt to the new world.
In his keynote at 18th Cloud Expo, Andrew Keys, Co-Founder of ConsenSys Enterprise, provided an overview of the evolution of the Internet and the Database and the future of their combination – the Blockchain. Andrew Keys is Co-Founder of ConsenSys Enterprise. He comes to ConsenSys Enterprise with capital markets, technology and entrepreneurial experience. Previously, he worked for UBS investment bank in equities analysis. Later, he was responsible for the creation and distribution of life settlement products to hedge funds and investment banks. After, he co-founded a revenue cycle management company where he learned about Bitcoin and eventually Ethereum.