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Open Source Docker Project Celebrates First Anniversary

Docker, Inc., the commercial entity behind the open source Docker project, today announced the one year anniversary of the project. Since launching in March 2013, Docker has experienced rapid growth with over one million downloads, more than 370 contributors, an ever-expanding list of high profile users, partners and integrations, and a prominent and well-known user-base.

“Containerization has emerged as an essential solution for sys-admins and developers, as it provides a flexible way to build, scale and deploy applications, and reduces the time and expense of cloud infrastructure,” said Al Hilwa, program director, application development software at IDC. “Docker is emerging as a standard for containerization, driving innovation among developers, sys-admins, and DevOps alike.”

Within the past year, Docker has reached over 8,000 published “Dockerized” applications in its public index. The community has organized over 70 Docker meetup groups in 27 countries, and the project is seeing a growing global user-base, including well-known companies such as eBay, Yandex, Mailgun, CloudFlare, Baidu and Spotify. The community has created integrations across a broad set of DevOps tools, Docker drivers have been accepted into OpenStack, and companies such as Red Hat, Rackspace, and Google have announced products based on or supporting Docker. Furthermore, Red Hat recently launched a container certification program based on Docker for its ISVs.

“The response we’ve received from the open source community throughout the past year makes this milestone an even more gratifying accomplishment and celebration,” said Solomon Hykes, founder and CTO of Docker. “We launched the Docker project with the goal of providing developers and sys-admins with a simpler and more-effective tool for building, scaling and deploying applications, and we are thrilled to see this objective coming to fruition. Ranging from our team to the entire robust community, the Docker ecosystem is driving innovation and altering how people view computing for the better.”

“Having reached the one year mark, it’s truly remarkable to reflect on the community’s accomplishments thus far,” said Ben Golub, CEO of Docker. “Docker’s success is a clear demonstration of the power and potential of open source, and we are beyond grateful to have such an amazing, active community. After just one year, we are confident that Docker is becoming the standard for containerization, and an important alternative to virtualization for many important workloads. We can’t wait to build off the successes in year two.”

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About Docker, Inc.

Docker, Inc. is the commercial entity behind the open source Docker project, and is the chief sponsor of the Docker ecosystem. Docker is an open source engine for deploying any application as a lightweight, portable, self-sufficient container that will run virtually anywhere. By delivering on the twin promises “Build Once…Run Anywhere” and “Configure Once…Run Anything,” Docker has seen explosive growth, and its impact is being seen across DevOps, PaaS and hybrid cloud environments. One year after launching, the Docker community is expanding rapidly: Docker containers have been downloaded over one million times, the project has received more than 10,000 Github stars, and is receiving contributions from more than 370 community developers. Over 8,000 “Dockerized” applications are now available at the Docker public index, and there are Docker meetup groups in 27 countries around the world. Docker, Inc. offers both commercial Docker services and PaaS offerings at the docker.com website.

Docker, Inc. is venture backed by Greylock Partners (Jerry Chen), Benchmark (Peter Fenton), Trinity Ventures (Dan Scholnick), AME Cloud Ventures (Yahoo! Founder Jerry Yang), Insight Venture PartnersY Combinator, and SV Angel (Ron Conway).

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