Welcome!

DevOps Journal Authors: Pat Romanski, Roger Strukhoff, Elizabeth White, Liz McMillan, Mike Kavis

Related Topics: DevOps Journal, Java, .NET, Linux, Virtualization, Web 2.0, Cloud Expo, Big Data Journal, IoT Expo

DevOps Journal: Article

Rackspace DevOps GM: "Very Organic For Our Customers"

Rackspace Launches DevOps Advisory Service

As we approach the upcoming @CloudExpo Silicon Valley, November 4-6, we find ourselves in an era of maturing cloud computing services, with lines beginning to blur among formerly discrete segments.

Among the things we're witnessing is a fuller integration of DevOps into the mix. Rackspace is one company in this discussion, having just launched its DevOps Advisory Service.

Rackspace Extends DevOps Service [story]

So we had a few questions for Prashanth Chandrasekar (pictured below), GM of Rackspace's DevOps Business Segment.

Cloud Computing Journal: What are the two or three key reasons your cloud customers are taking a DevOps approach these days?

Prashanth Chandarasekar: They are consuming DevOps Automation for several reasons.

The first is to shorten the time to market for their products and features and reduce bug fixes, that is, realize internal goals of deploying into production multiple times a day or week relative to where they are today. The only way to achieve this goal is to move to a DevOps model.

Second, they are experiencing high growth and need to automatically scale out their technology infrastructure.

Third, planning and preparing for future growth and ensuring that their technology infrastructure is agile and flexible, based on this future expected increase in their own user base, usage of their product, etc.

Fourth, they require deep , constant, and proactive monitoring of their application environment using tools like New Relic, StatsD/Graphite and Logstash, because they cannot tolerate any downtime or latency.

Finally, they want to fully exploit the cloud and cannot do so with a traditional SysOps/Sys Admin server-by-server management model.

CCJ: To what degree has cloud computing triggered a realization among your customers that they should move toward DevOps? And what are the key drivers: complexity, agility, striving to maintain competitive advantage?

Prashanth: It's very organic for our customers to move from first utilizing the cloud, experiencing all the on-demand, elastic properties of the form-factor to realizing that they need DevOps and Automation to fully exploit the full power of the cloud and meet their business objectives with respect to revenue and developer productivity.

Oftentimes, our cloud customers have already dabbled with DevOps tools to manage the complexity of their environments efficiently and realize they can leverage the expertise we provide through Rackspace DevOps Automation Service level to execute on the same DevOps-focused activities at scale on a 24/7 basis.

In other cases, customers have realized that they need to be more advanced internally-through enablement, organizational culture, etc.-to utilize DevOps tools. We launched DevOps Advisory Service to address this audience and to bridge them to utilizing DevOps tools as a defacto way to manage their cloud.

CCJ: Can you explain the expansion in stack environments a bit for our audience? That is, what was offered before, what's being offered now, and what is driving your expansion?

Prashanth: Based on the feedback from our earliest customers, they wanted to spin up their DevOps automation-enabled environments almost immediately on our cloud, and wanted to do the same on Windows based environments.

We took this feedback and built fundamental Linux and Windows stacks that represented our best-of-breed/best practice advice on Ruby, Python, PHP, Node.js, Tomcat and ASP and .Net (for Windows) that customers could access within an hour of working with us.

This allows our customers to have a working application that is completely automated up and running in remarkable speed.

Contact Me on Twitter

Follow @CloudExpo on Twitter

More Stories By Roger Strukhoff

Roger Strukhoff (@IoT2040) is Executive Director of the Tau Institute for Global ICT Research, with offices in Illinois and Manila. He is Conference Chair of @CloudExpo & @ThingsExpo, and Editor of SYS-CON Media's CloudComputing BigData & IoT Journals. He holds a BA from Knox College & conducted MBA studies at CSU-East Bay.

Comments (0)

Share your thoughts on this story.

Add your comment
You must be signed in to add a comment. Sign-in | Register

In accordance with our Comment Policy, we encourage comments that are on topic, relevant and to-the-point. We will remove comments that include profanity, personal attacks, racial slurs, threats of violence, or other inappropriate material that violates our Terms and Conditions, and will block users who make repeated violations. We ask all readers to expect diversity of opinion and to treat one another with dignity and respect.


Latest Stories from DevOps Journal
Achieve continuous delivery of applications by leveraging ElasticBox and Jenkins. In his session at DevOps Summit, Monish Sharma, VP of Customer Success at ElasticBox, will demonstrate how you can achieve the following using ElasticBox and the ElasticBox Jenkins Plugin: Create consistency across dev, staging, and production environments Continuous delivery across multiple clouds to handle high loads Ensure consistent policy management across environments: tagging, admin boxes, traceability Spin up machines and environments quickly Deploy applications to any cloud Enable real-time collaboration between developers and operations
WaveMaker CEO Samir Ghosh is taking a new pass at aPaas, and leveraging the increasingly popular Docker open-source platform, with the announcement of WaveMaker Enterprise. The new version of the company's eponymous software “enables instant, end-to-end custom web app creation and management by professional and non-professional developers (alike) and development teams,” according to the company. We asked Samir a few questions about this, and here's what he had to say: Cloud Computing Journal: You've mentioned the previous challenge of business-side developers making that jump from design to deployment. What sort of learning curve will they still face with Wavemaker Enterprise? Samir Ghosh: “Business-side developers” can include non-programming business users or professional developers under tight schedules or with limited mobile or front-end programming expertise. Both can use WaveMaker to meet their app development needs, but may have different deployment needs. I think business users just want their app to run as easily as possible. In WaveMaker, they can literally click a button and their application will run, either on our public cloud or on the enterprise’s private...
The old monolithic style of building enterprise applications just isn't cutting it any more. It results in applications and teams both that are complex, inefficient, and inflexible, with considerable communication overhead and long change cycles. Microservices architectures, while they've been around for a while, are now gaining serious traction with software organizations, and for good reasons: they enable small targeted teams, rapid continuous deployment, independent updates, true polyglot languages and persistence layers, and a host of other benefits. But truly adopting a microservices architecture requires dramatic changes across the entire organization, and a DevOps culture is absolutely essential.
Docker offers a new, lightweight approach to application portability. Applications are shipped using a common container format and managed with a high-level API. Their processes run within isolated namespaces that abstract the operating environment independently of the distribution, versions, network setup, and other details of this environment. This "containerization" has often been nicknamed "the new virtualization." But containers are more than lightweight virtual machines. Beyond their smaller footprint, shorter boot times, and higher consolidation factors, they also bring a lot of new features and use cases that were not possible with classical virtual machines.
Leysin American School is an exclusive, private boarding school located in Leysin, Switzerland. Leysin selected an OpenStack-powered, private cloud as a service to manage multiple applications and provide development environments for students across the institution. Seeking to meet rigid data sovereignty and data integrity requirements while offering flexible, on-demand cloud resources to users, Leysin identified OpenStack as the clear choice to round out the school's cloud strategy. Additionally, the school sought a partner to provide OpenStack infrastructure deployment and operations expertise. They ultimately selected Blue Box’s Private Cloud as a Service, powered by OpenStack, leveraging Blue Box's Zurich, Switzerland data center.
In a world of ever-accelerating business cycles and fast-changing client expectations, the cloud increasingly serves as a growth engine and a path to new business models. Dynamic clouds enable businesses to continuously reinvent themselves, adapting their business processes, their service and software delivery and their operations to achieve speed-to-market and quick response to customer feedback. As the cloud evolves, the industry has multiple competing cloud technologies, offering on-premises and off-premises cloud platforms for both Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) and Platform as a Service (PaaS). In parallel, cloud standards are also evolving, including community standards like OpenStack and CloudFoundry. Most organizations who are adopting the Cloud today are ending up adopting it in complex ‘dynamic-hybrid’ environments. There is physical infrastructure that now co-exists along with the new dynamic-hybrid on-premises and off-premises Cloud hosted environments.
High performing enterprise Software Quality Assurance (SQA) teams validate systems are ready for use – getting most actively involved as components integrate and form complete systems. These teams catch and report on defects, making sure the customer gets the best software possible. SQA teams have leveraged automation and virtualization to execute more thorough testing in less time – bringing Dev and Ops together, ensuring production readiness. Does the emergence of DevOps mean the end of Enterprise SQA? Does the SQA function become redundant?
This story came in from Joseph – one of our fellow dynaTrace users and a performance engineer at a large fleet management service company. Their fleet management software runs on .NET, is developed in-house, is load tested with JMeter and monitored in Production with dynaTrace. A usage and configuration change of their dependency injection library turned out to dramatically impact CPU and memory usage while not yet impacting end user experience. Lessons learned: resource usage monitoring is as important as response time and throughput. On Wednesday, July 3, Joseph’s ops team deployed the latest version into their production environment. Load (=throughput) and response time are two key application health measures the application owner team has on their production dashboards.
The recent trends like cloud computing, social, mobile and Internet of Things are forcing enterprises to modernize in order to compete in the competitive globalized markets. However, enterprises are approaching newer technologies with a more silo-ed way, gaining only sub optimal benefits. The Modern Enterprise model is presented as a newer way to think of enterprise IT, which takes a more holistic approach to embracing modern technologies. This model makes use of Composable Enterprise framework put forward by Jonathan Murray of WMG.
Software development, like manufacturing, is a craft that requires the application of creative approaches to solve problems given a wide range of constraints. However, while engineering design may be craftwork, the production of most designed objects relies on a standardized and automated manufacturing process. By contrast, much of moving an application from prototype to production and, indeed, maintaining the application through its lifecycle has often remained craftwork. In his session at DevOps Summit, Gordon Haff, senior cloud strategy marketing and evangelism manager at Red Hat, will discuss the many lessons and processes that DevOps can learn from manufacturing and the assembly line-like tools, such as Platform-as-a-Service, that provide the necessary abstraction and automation to make industrialized DevOps possible.