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OpenStack Deployment Practicality By @ABridgwater | @DevOpsSummit [#DevOps]

Cloud offers the promise of a new era they say – and a new style of IT at that

Goodness there is a lot of talk about cloud computing. This ‘talk and chatter' is part of the problem, i.e., we look at it, we prod it and we might even test it out - but do we get down to practical implementation, deployment and (if you happen to be a fan of the term) actual cloud ‘rollout' today?

Cloud offers the promise of a new era they say - and a new style of IT at that.

But this again is the problem and we know that cloud can only deliver on the promises it makes if it is part of a well-coordinated effort that brings together both existing IT infrastructure and these new service-based technologies.

A new charter for implementation
HP for its part has announced the formation of a new professional services practice with a charter to:

... help enterprises implement OpenStack technology based clouds.

HP Helion OpenStack Professional Services (quite a mouthful, but we are promised that it's worth it) are delivered by a team of HP architects and cloud technologists. It is backed by hundreds of engineers who run one of the world's largest OpenStack public clouds (that, if you hadn't guessed is the HP Helion Public Cloud) and who have committed thousands of lines of code to the OpenStack community.

The company is calling out its expertise in the following fields as an affirmation of its ability to deliver this technology:

  • Design
  • Storage
  • Network
  • Security
  • Database
  • Scalability
  • High availability and other OpenStack-based services.

"Organizations implementing OpenStack cloud solutions often rely on our broad ecosystem to augment their staff and move faster," said Jonathan Bryce, executive director of the OpenStack Foundation. "Companies like HP, who are strong contributors to the project can help these organizations be confident in their OpenStack deployments by providing access to additional expertise."

HP Helion OpenStack Professional Services include an OpenStack technology assessment: consultants work with customers to understand their desired business outcomes and identify a strategy to achieve them. They then define the appropriate cloud workload deployment model (private, managed, public or hybrid) and recommending proof-of-concept, pre-production or production environments.

There is also an OpenStack technology design and implementation option here - and this means that services use best practices to architect cloud infrastructures, facilitate workload migrations and proof-of-concept projects, or integrate OpenStack technology deployments into a pre-production environment for testing.

There is also an OpenStack technology accelerator here: rapid deployment of OpenStack technology for trial, development environment or a standard deployment with a fixed service. A technology optimization service completes the set and this includes remote capacity and performance monitoring services, continuous integration and patching, and 24/7 support.

"OpenStack technology is gaining traction in the enterprise, but the lack of in-house OpenStack expertise can be a barrier to realizing the technology's full potential," said Tom Norton, vice president, HP Helion Professional Services, HP. "We have amassed a team with unsurpassed experience in OpenStack technology to help customers rapidly define, implement and manage OpenStack-based solutions successfully."

OpenStack is the fastest-growing cloud-computing open-source project and is gaining increasing recognition for its interoperability and enterprise-grade functionality. HP made a strategic bet on the OpenStack project early on as a founding platinum member of the OpenStack Foundation, and has four years of experience running OpenStack cloud services at scale in enterprise environments.

Today HP is the leading code contributor to the next release of OpenStack, "Juno," set for October 2014.

This post is sponsored by The Business Value Exchange and HP Enterprise Services

More Stories By Adrian Bridgwater

Adrian Bridgwater is a freelance journalist and corporate content creation specialist focusing on cross platform software application development as well as all related aspects software engineering, project management and technology as a whole.

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