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DevOps as a Service (DaaS)? | @DevOpsSummit [#DevOps]

Personally I am not a fan of the term. Mainly because DevOps is not a ‘Service’

May 11, 2014

DevOps as a Service (DaaS)?

In a recent post I posted on DevOps.com, I suggested the term DevOps as a Service (DaaS).

Personally I am not a fan of the term.

Mainly because DevOps is not a ‘Service’.

It is an approach to achieve business objectives by adopting a set of capabilities, namely:

  • Continuous Business Planning
  • Collaborative Development
  • Continuous Integration
  • Continuous Deployment
  • Continuous Testing
  • Continuous Feedback

Adopting these capabilities requires changing or enhancing people (culture), processes and technology (tools). Hence, not a set of services, but a set of capabilities.

That being said, the tools the make up the proverbial DevOps toolchain are tools. These tools can be hosted and made available ‘as a service’. Could these collectively be called ‘DevOps as a Service’?

IBM DevOps Services

IBM has recently introduces exactly that – DevOps services. This is a part of IBM’s new Platform as a Service (PaaS) offering called ‘Codename: BlueMix’. Some of these DevOps Services were initially included on IBM Rational’s Jazzhub Software as a Service (SaaS) offering. With the launch of the BlueMix beta, Jazzhub has been merged with BlueMix. These services can however, still be used independently to develop applications not targeted for the BlueMix platform.

The DevOps Services on BlueMix as are:

  • Git hosting as a Service
  • Web based IDE
  • Agile planning & tracking, team collaboration as a Service
  • Mobile Quality Assurance (MQA) as a Service
  • Continuous Integration as a Service
  • Deployment Automation as a Service

(Some of these services are still in Beta.)

Read my full post – ‘DevOps for PaaS‘ in my recent post on DevOps.com. Read my posts on Understanding and Adopting DevOps.

Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By Sanjeev Sharma

Sanjeev is a 20-year veteran of the software industry. For the past 18 years he has been a solution architect with Rational Software, an IBM brand. His areas of expertise include DevOps, Mobile Development and UX, Lean and Agile Transformation, Application Lifecycle Management and Software Supply Chains. He is a DevOps Thought Leader at IBM and currently leads IBM’s Worldwide Technical Sales team for DevOps. He speaks regularly at conferences and has written several papers. He is also the author of the DevOps For Dummies book.

Sanjeev has an Electrical Engineering degree from The National Institute of Technology, Kurukshetra, India and a Masters in Computer Science from Villanova University, United States. He is passionate about his family, travel, reading, Science Fiction movies and Airline Miles. He blogs about DevOps at http://bit.ly/sdarchitect and tweets as @sd_architect

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