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DevOps Days Vancouver 2014 By @DDossot | @DevOpsSummit [#DevOps]

Ignite talks are intense, as the slides mercilessly fly-by every 15 seconds, and this for 5 minutes sharp

Call Me Never (Ignite Talk)

I've been super honored to give an ignite talk during DevOps Days Vancouver 2014. Ignite talks are intense, as the slides mercilessly fly-by every 15 seconds, and this for 5 minutes sharp (yes, that's just 20 slides!).

In this talk, I tried to present some of the lessons we've learned at Unbounce while rebuilding our page serving infrastructure. Our availability target is five-nines (that's an allowance of 6 seconds of downtime per week) so we've put lots of effort into building a stable, self-healing, gracefully-degrading piece of software. We had a few close calls though, hence the lessons learned shared in this talk.

I was initially planning to cover this subject in a 30 minutes talk and had gathered tons of material to go in-depth, so delivering this material in 5 minutes was an interesting challenge! It was good actually, as it forced me to be drastically concise, while trying to preserve interesting content.

If you can put up with my French accent, you can watch the recorded presentation here:

Otherwise, here are the slides:

Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By David Dossot

David Dossot has worked as a software engineer and architect for more than 14 years. He is a co-author of Mule in Action and is the project despot of the JCR Transport and a member of the Mule Community Committee. He is the project lead of NxBRE, an open source business rules engine for the .NET platform (selected for O'Reilly's Windows Developer Power Tools). He is also a judge for the Jolt Product Excellence Awards and has written several articles for SD Magazine. He holds a Production Systems Engineering Diploma from ESSTIN.

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