Welcome!

@DevOpsSummit Authors: Pat Romanski, Elizabeth White, Liz McMillan, Yeshim Deniz, Zakia Bouachraoui

Related Topics: @DevOpsSummit, Open Source Cloud, Containers Expo Blog

@DevOpsSummit: Blog Post

What Is DevOps? | @DevOpsSummit #DevOps #Docker #Containers #Microservices

Why it’s the future and how to get it going with your team

DevOps (Development + Operations) is defined by Wikipedia as a software method that emphasizes communication, collaboration, integration, automation, and measurement of cooperation between software developers and other IT professionals. In spirit, it is a new movement that seeks to integrate all parts of the software development cycle with actual operations, so they run as a team rather than dis-jointed or individual silos that don't communicate well with each other. It has recently taken off due to the rise of mobile applications, Software-as-a-Service, or any other online services which require constant production 24x7x365, versus the prior era of selling packaged software.

Why DevOps now?
With the massive growth in online services - whether it's a website, mobile application, or Software-as-a-Service type product - they all share a common thread, which is that they require availability 24x7x365. This is very different than the prior era of selling packaged software, where often an integrator or VaR (Value-Added Reseller) would install, configure and maintain the software.

At the same time, there has been an explosion in the use of open-source software which by its very nature, has very little support. In fact, purchasing support for an open-source product is the exception, versus the norm in the days of packaged software. Because of this, development and operations have to work closer together to make sure that the software that is being implemented, actually works in production. In addition, it has to be able to be maintained without disrupting the service to end-users, as well as upgraded in a logical fashion that not only doesn't cause a disruption, but has the capability to ‘roll-back' if new problems are introduced that aren't easily contained. DevOps is the idea that software developers' work ‘flows through' to operations, and they work together to make sure it works, with operations ‘feeding back' problems, challenges, and potential solutions, allowing both sides to work as a team rather than different groups.

How do you get started with DevOps?
It's obviously far easier to start with a DevOps team than to try to integrate existing groups. However, in either case, a major tenet of DevOps is communications - why are you doing it, what are you hoping to accomplish, and what problems will you be solving?

The nature of DevOps is collaborative, so rather than a pure top-down structure with managers directing developers, its more of a team exercise with a focus on team leaders and the team suggestion solutions (basically, a more relaxed management structure). In either case, the best way to get started is to start integrating your teams and creating feedback loops so they have a way to communicate with each other. In addition, there should be constant communication between different team members (ideally in different groups) so that problems, solutions, and timelines are integrated between team members.

A big part of the DevOps philosophy is that the team should be most aware of the subtleties and nuances of the underlying software infrastructure, and should be able to solve each problem more efficiently than isolated groups outside the actual production environment.

What tools do DevOps team use?
DevOps team lean heavily on tools that allow for communication and collaboration. Atlassian makes tools like Confluence and JIRA, which are popular with DevOps teams.

Slack is a fast growing newcomer, largely focusing on team chat and communication. Other tools such as Ansible, Puppet, and Chef allow developers to create playbooks for automating tedious or repetitive chores.

Docker, a tool for managing containers (which themselves allow code to be shipped between servers in a simplified and elegant way) is taking off in a big way right now. If you get involved with any of these tools and their communities, you can usually find what others are doing or using to make their DevOps teams move faster and more efficiently. It is not uncommon to be adding and removing tools that other teams use, since the industry is moving so fast.

In conclusion
The DevOps method is new and here to stay, because it is tied to where IT is growing the fastest. While a DevOps culture can be demanding, if it's done correctly, it can be less stressful because it is done collaboratively.  This means less errors, less re-coding, and faster code to production. Although its new and changing rapidly, DevOps can be fulfilling, fun, and a better fit for today's technology environment.

More Stories By Marty Puranik

Marty Puranik is founder, president and CEO of Atlantic.Net, a profitable and growing Hosting Solutions Provider in Orlando. In 1994 Marty and a classmate founded Atlantic.Net from their dorm rooms at the University of Florida. Operating under the name ICC Computers, they quickly developed a reputation for quality and service and in 1995 launched one of the first commercial Internet services in North Florida. In 1996, ICC ceased retail operations to focus solely on Internet connectivity. Under Marty’s leadership Atlantic.Net became one of Florida’s largest privately-owned ISPs, providing Internet access in cities and small towns throughout Florida and the southeastern United States. Marty’s strengths as a leader and visionary have helped him lead a successful business for 17 years.

@DevOpsSummit Stories
With more than 30 Kubernetes solutions in the marketplace, it's tempting to think Kubernetes and the vendor ecosystem has solved the problem of operationalizing containers at scale or of automatically managing the elasticity of the underlying infrastructure that these solutions need to be truly scalable. Far from it. There are at least six major pain points that companies experience when they try to deploy and run Kubernetes in their complex environments. In this presentation, the speaker will detail these pain points and explain how cloud can address them.
In an era of historic innovation fueled by unprecedented access to data and technology, the low cost and risk of entering new markets has leveled the playing field for business. Today, any ambitious innovator can easily introduce a new application or product that can reinvent business models and transform the client experience. In their Day 2 Keynote at 19th Cloud Expo, Mercer Rowe, IBM Vice President of Strategic Alliances, and Raejeanne Skillern, Intel Vice President of Data Center Group and GM, discussed how clients in this new era of innovation can apply data, technology, plus human ingenuity to springboard to advance new business value and opportunities.
Discussions of cloud computing have evolved in recent years from a focus on specific types of cloud, to a world of hybrid cloud, and to a world dominated by the APIs that make today's multi-cloud environments and hybrid clouds possible. In this Power Panel at 17th Cloud Expo, moderated by Conference Chair Roger Strukhoff, panelists addressed the importance of customers being able to use the specific technologies they need, through environments and ecosystems that expose their APIs to make true change and transformation possible.
The current age of digital transformation means that IT organizations must adapt their toolset to cover all digital experiences, beyond just the end users’. Today’s businesses can no longer focus solely on the digital interactions they manage with employees or customers; they must now contend with non-traditional factors. Whether it's the power of brand to make or break a company, the need to monitor across all locations 24/7, or the ability to proactively resolve issues, companies must adapt to the new world.
In his session at 20th Cloud Expo, Scott Davis, CTO of Embotics, discussed how automation can provide the dynamic management required to cost-effectively deliver microservices and container solutions at scale. He also discussed how flexible automation is the key to effectively bridging and seamlessly coordinating both IT and developer needs for component orchestration across disparate clouds – an increasingly important requirement at today’s multi-cloud enterprise.