Welcome!

@DevOpsSummit Authors: Elizabeth White, Pat Romanski, Liz McMillan, Yeshim Deniz, SmartBear Blog

Related Topics: @DevOpsSummit, Java IoT, Microservices Expo, Linux Containers, Containers Expo Blog

@DevOpsSummit: Blog Feed Post

Enterprise Release Management By @DaliborSiroky | @DevOpsSummit #DevOps #BigData #API #Docker

Large, decentralized organizations assign responsibility for strategic, release management functions to several existing roles

Six Roles Key to Enterprise Release Management Success
By Dalibor Siroky

Large organizations engaged in enterprise release management seldom have a single "enterprise release manager."  Instead of a single, "enterprise-wide" responsibility, most large, decentralized organizations assign responsibility for more strategic, release management functions to several existing roles.

An enterprise release management practice supports and is supported by the following enterprise release management roles:

IT Portfolio Management - An efficient ERM practice provides portfolio managers greater visibility into changes affecting multiple systems to create a consolidated status for change initiatives across an entire portfolio.  By assembling data across multiple initiatives, ERM facilitates a process of continuous improvement at the portfolio level giving organizations a central mechanism to track common challenges and lessons learned. With ERM IT Portfolio Managers make strategic adjustments to both staffing and spend across departments as change initiatives evolve continuously.

Release Management - ERM creates a standard view of the end-to-end release lifecycle providing better decision support to release managers responsible for delivering software on time and under budget.  Armed with a more detailed and accurate view of project status organizations practicing ERM are able to release more frequently and with greater integrity and predictability. Dependencies between systems are tracked and release managers are able to accurately assess the impact of scheduling changes to a consolidated timeline.  An ERM practice maintains an up-to-date model of resources supporting a release, giving release managers the ability to gauge the capacity of an organization to support an ongoing, iterative release process by tracking organizational capacity and non-production testing environments.

Environment Management - Individuals and teams responsible for the allocation, provisioning and configuration of production and non-production environments are often at the mercy of shifting schedules and unreliable estimates of capacity requirements during the software delivery lifecycle.  A comprehensive approach to Enterprise Release Management incorporates production environment, non-production testing environment, and data environment effort and requirements into an overall plan to support software delivery.  Under an ERM practice environment management can use a continuously updated and more accurate status to make more efficient use of both physical and cloud-based infrastructure to support software delivery.

Quality Management - With ERM, quality assurance and quality engineering managers are able to forecast demand and allocate limited testing resources across multiple projects in response to shifting schedules.  With an ERM practice QA managers have better visibility into the release pipelines and so can better prioritize and allocate resources.

IT Service Management - Service managers need clear visibility into the progress of the handling of their change requests and can now track them through the release process. Service managers gain confidence and are exposed to less risk as changes are deployed in a structured and repeatable way.

Product Management - Under a strong ERM practice project managers are no longer spending 30-40% of their time distracting key resources with meetings to measure status or maintaining manual spreadsheets tracking progress toward a release goal.  Project managers benefit from an always up-to-date picture of project status and are able to manage scheduling and resource conflicts across groups as they develop.

For more information about how these roles support release management practices.  Download our latest whitepaper on Enterprise Release Management.

The post 6 Roles Key to Enterprise Release Management Success appeared first on Plutora Inc.

Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By Plutora Blog

Plutora provides Enterprise Release and Test Environment Management SaaS solutions aligning process, technology, and information to solve release orchestration challenges for the enterprise.

Plutora’s SaaS solution enables organizations to model release management and test environment management activities as a bridge between agile project teams and an enterprise’s ITSM initiatives. Using Plutora, you can orchestrate parallel releases from several independent DevOps groups all while giving your executives as well as change management specialists insight into overall risk.

Supporting the largest releases for the largest organizations throughout North America, EMEA, and Asia Pacific, Plutora provides proof that large companies can adopt DevOps while managing the risks that come with wider adoption of self-service and agile software development in the enterprise. Aligning process, technology, and information to solve increasingly complex release orchestration challenges, this Gartner “Cool Vendor in IT DevOps” upgrades the enterprise release management from spreadsheets, meetings, and email to an integrated dashboard giving release managers insight and control over large software releases.

@DevOpsSummit Stories
DevOpsSummit New York 2018, colocated with CloudEXPO | DXWorldEXPO New York 2018 will be held November 11-13, 2018, in New York City. Digital Transformation (DX) is a major focus with the introduction of DXWorldEXPO within the program. Successful transformation requires a laser focus on being data-driven and on using all the tools available that enable transformation if they plan to survive over the long term. A total of 88% of Fortune 500 companies from a generation ago are now out of business. Only 12% still survive. Similar percentages are found throughout enterprises of all sizes.
For better or worse, DevOps has gone mainstream. All doubt was removed when IBM and HP threw up their respective DevOps microsites. Where are we on the hype cycle? It's hard to say for sure but there's a feeling we're heading for the "Peak of Inflated Expectations." What does this mean for the enterprise? Should they avoid DevOps? Definitely not. Should they be cautious though? Absolutely. The truth is that DevOps and the enterprise are at best strange bedfellows. The movement has its roots in the tech community's elite. Open source projects and methodologies driven by the alumni of companies like Netflix, Google and Amazon. This is a great thing for the evolution of DevOps. It can be alienating for Enterprise IT though. Learning about Netflix and their simian armies, or Facebook and their mind-melting scale is fascinating. Can you take it back to the office on Monday morning though?
For organizations that have amassed large sums of software complexity, taking a microservices approach is the first step toward DevOps and continuous improvement / development. Integrating system-level analysis with microservices makes it easier to change and add functionality to applications at any time without the increase of risk. Before you start big transformation projects or a cloud migration, make sure these changes won’t take down your entire organization.
Learn how to solve the problem of keeping files in sync between multiple Docker containers. In his session at 16th Cloud Expo, Aaron Brongersma, Senior Infrastructure Engineer at Modulus, discussed using rsync, GlusterFS, EBS and Bit Torrent Sync. He broke down the tools that are needed to help create a seamless user experience. In the end, can we have an environment where we can easily move Docker containers, servers, and volumes without impacting our applications? He shared his results so you can decide for yourself.
The Jevons Paradox suggests that when technological advances increase efficiency of a resource, it results in an overall increase in consumption. Writing on the increased use of coal as a result of technological improvements, 19th-century economist William Stanley Jevons found that these improvements led to the development of new ways to utilize coal. In his session at 19th Cloud Expo, Mark Thiele, Chief Strategy Officer for Apcera, compared the Jevons Paradox to modern-day enterprise IT, examining how the Internet and the cloud has allowed for the democratization of IT, resulting in an increased demand for the cloud and the drive to develop new ways to utilize it.