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Enterprise Release Management By @DaliborSiroky | @DevOpsSummit #DevOps #BigData #API #Docker

Large, decentralized organizations assign responsibility for strategic, release management functions to several existing roles

Six Roles Key to Enterprise Release Management Success
By Dalibor Siroky

Large organizations engaged in enterprise release management seldom have a single "enterprise release manager."  Instead of a single, "enterprise-wide" responsibility, most large, decentralized organizations assign responsibility for more strategic, release management functions to several existing roles.

An enterprise release management practice supports and is supported by the following enterprise release management roles:

IT Portfolio Management - An efficient ERM practice provides portfolio managers greater visibility into changes affecting multiple systems to create a consolidated status for change initiatives across an entire portfolio.  By assembling data across multiple initiatives, ERM facilitates a process of continuous improvement at the portfolio level giving organizations a central mechanism to track common challenges and lessons learned. With ERM IT Portfolio Managers make strategic adjustments to both staffing and spend across departments as change initiatives evolve continuously.

Release Management - ERM creates a standard view of the end-to-end release lifecycle providing better decision support to release managers responsible for delivering software on time and under budget.  Armed with a more detailed and accurate view of project status organizations practicing ERM are able to release more frequently and with greater integrity and predictability. Dependencies between systems are tracked and release managers are able to accurately assess the impact of scheduling changes to a consolidated timeline.  An ERM practice maintains an up-to-date model of resources supporting a release, giving release managers the ability to gauge the capacity of an organization to support an ongoing, iterative release process by tracking organizational capacity and non-production testing environments.

Environment Management - Individuals and teams responsible for the allocation, provisioning and configuration of production and non-production environments are often at the mercy of shifting schedules and unreliable estimates of capacity requirements during the software delivery lifecycle.  A comprehensive approach to Enterprise Release Management incorporates production environment, non-production testing environment, and data environment effort and requirements into an overall plan to support software delivery.  Under an ERM practice environment management can use a continuously updated and more accurate status to make more efficient use of both physical and cloud-based infrastructure to support software delivery.

Quality Management - With ERM, quality assurance and quality engineering managers are able to forecast demand and allocate limited testing resources across multiple projects in response to shifting schedules.  With an ERM practice QA managers have better visibility into the release pipelines and so can better prioritize and allocate resources.

IT Service Management - Service managers need clear visibility into the progress of the handling of their change requests and can now track them through the release process. Service managers gain confidence and are exposed to less risk as changes are deployed in a structured and repeatable way.

Product Management - Under a strong ERM practice project managers are no longer spending 30-40% of their time distracting key resources with meetings to measure status or maintaining manual spreadsheets tracking progress toward a release goal.  Project managers benefit from an always up-to-date picture of project status and are able to manage scheduling and resource conflicts across groups as they develop.

For more information about how these roles support release management practices.  Download our latest whitepaper on Enterprise Release Management.

The post 6 Roles Key to Enterprise Release Management Success appeared first on Plutora Inc.

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Plutora provides Enterprise Release and Test Environment Management SaaS solutions aligning process, technology, and information to solve release orchestration challenges for the enterprise.

Plutora’s SaaS solution enables organizations to model release management and test environment management activities as a bridge between agile project teams and an enterprise’s ITSM initiatives. Using Plutora, you can orchestrate parallel releases from several independent DevOps groups all while giving your executives as well as change management specialists insight into overall risk.

Supporting the largest releases for the largest organizations throughout North America, EMEA, and Asia Pacific, Plutora provides proof that large companies can adopt DevOps while managing the risks that come with wider adoption of self-service and agile software development in the enterprise. Aligning process, technology, and information to solve increasingly complex release orchestration challenges, this Gartner “Cool Vendor in IT DevOps” upgrades the enterprise release management from spreadsheets, meetings, and email to an integrated dashboard giving release managers insight and control over large software releases.

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René Bostic is the Technical VP of the IBM Cloud Unit in North America. Enjoying her career with IBM during the modern millennial technological era, she is an expert in cloud computing, DevOps and emerging cloud technologies such as Blockchain. Her strengths and core competencies include a proven record of accomplishments in consensus building at all levels to assess, plan, and implement enterprise and cloud computing solutions. René is a member of the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) and a member of the Society of Information Management (SIM) Atlanta Chapter. She received a Business and Economics degree with a minor in Computer Science from St. Andrews Presbyterian University (Laurinburg, North Carolina). She resides in metro-Atlanta (Georgia).
Contino is a global technical consultancy that helps highly-regulated enterprises transform faster, modernizing their way of working through DevOps and cloud computing. They focus on building capability and assisting our clients to in-source strategic technology capability so they get to market quickly and build their own innovation engine.
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