Welcome!

@DevOpsSummit Authors: Elizabeth White, Pat Romanski, Liz McMillan, Yeshim Deniz, SmartBear Blog

Related Topics: @DevOpsSummit, Linux Containers, @CloudExpo, @DXWorldExpo, @ThingsExpo

@DevOpsSummit: Article

Managers Don’t Have to Hate Agile | @CloudExpo #IoT #Agile #DevOps

What is the solution to relieve the tension for Agile and enable these two different worlds to get along

Managers Don’t Have to Hate Agile

Earlier this year Forbes published an article titled "Why Do Managers Hate Agile?" The author,Steve Denning, builds a case for managers hating Agile due to "management" and "Agile" being defined as two different worlds. It's like Men are From Mars and Women are from Venus, only we're talking about the IT world and management and developers, instead of men and women. The article caught my attention for the obvious reason that CollabNet sells products and services to help support Agile development efforts, sparking the question, "Why would managers hate Agile?"

In the article, the first world of "Management" is referenced as "The vertical world of hierarchical bureaucracy."  Management is seen as the boss at the top of the totem pole and individuals at the bottom. This world is governed by roles, rules, plans and reports.

The second world of "Agile" is referenced as "The horizontal world of Agile," and described as one operating horizontally with a focus on the customer instead of a vertical dynamic with people reporting upwards to bosses. Therefore, there is tension between the two worlds and the perception that managers hate Agile because it turns their world on its side and creates confusion. Management may not understand the needs of Agile developers and vice versa. The two entities speak a different language and don't know how to communicate with each other. Sound familiar?

So what is the solution to relieve the tension for Agile and enable these two different worlds to not only get along, but also to work collaboratively to produce innovative products and services for their customers? The answer is...transparency. It sounds so simple...transparency, visibility, awareness. Yes, this is the key for managers to truly understand Agile developers and begin to work together.

Transparency = Trust
The concept of transparency is one that CollabNet wholeheartedly embraces. OurTeamForge platform is specifically designed to give developers the tools they want to use and managers the end-to-end visibility and traceability they need - across the entire tool chain - and advanced data analytics and trending reports. As a result, transparency creates trust between management and developers.

When managers have visibility into the work of their developers and access to the reports they need, then the two worlds can come together not as enemies, but as partners. And the result is that managers don't have to hate Agile.

What is your experience with the two Worlds of "Management" and "Agile"?

More Stories By Flint Brenton

Mr. Flint Brenton has extensive experience building successful software companies, with a proven track record of accelerating growth through innovation and sales execution. He is currently CEO of CollabNet, a Vector Capital-owned leader in open Application Lifecycle Management (ALM). He also serves as an operating partner at Vector, advancing its position as a transformational partner to technology businesses. Mr. Brenton is a member of the Software & Services Division (SSD), and is on the board of directors for the Software & Information Industry Association (SIIA). Previously, Mr. Brenton served as president and CEO of AccelOps, a provider of IT operations analytics for cloud and virtualized infrastructures. Prior to that, he served as president and CEO of Tidal Software, a leader in application automation software. At both AccelOps and Tidal Software, Mr. Brenton more than tripled sales under his leadership while focusing both companies on disruptive product introductions. Tidal Software was later acquired by Cisco and Mr. Brenton served in follow-on capacities there, including vice president of advanced services, and senior vice president of engineering for Cisco's cloud-based Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) and Platform as a Service (PaaS) offerings. He also has held leadership positions at NetIQ, Compaq Computer Corporation, BMC Software and IBM. He received a master's in business and public management from Rice University and a Bachelor of Science degree from Mount Union College.

@DevOpsSummit Stories
For better or worse, DevOps has gone mainstream. All doubt was removed when IBM and HP threw up their respective DevOps microsites. Where are we on the hype cycle? It's hard to say for sure but there's a feeling we're heading for the "Peak of Inflated Expectations." What does this mean for the enterprise? Should they avoid DevOps? Definitely not. Should they be cautious though? Absolutely. The truth is that DevOps and the enterprise are at best strange bedfellows. The movement has its roots in the tech community's elite. Open source projects and methodologies driven by the alumni of companies like Netflix, Google and Amazon. This is a great thing for the evolution of DevOps. It can be alienating for Enterprise IT though. Learning about Netflix and their simian armies, or Facebook and their mind-melting scale is fascinating. Can you take it back to the office on Monday morning though?
For organizations that have amassed large sums of software complexity, taking a microservices approach is the first step toward DevOps and continuous improvement / development. Integrating system-level analysis with microservices makes it easier to change and add functionality to applications at any time without the increase of risk. Before you start big transformation projects or a cloud migration, make sure these changes won’t take down your entire organization.
Learn how to solve the problem of keeping files in sync between multiple Docker containers. In his session at 16th Cloud Expo, Aaron Brongersma, Senior Infrastructure Engineer at Modulus, discussed using rsync, GlusterFS, EBS and Bit Torrent Sync. He broke down the tools that are needed to help create a seamless user experience. In the end, can we have an environment where we can easily move Docker containers, servers, and volumes without impacting our applications? He shared his results so you can decide for yourself.
The Jevons Paradox suggests that when technological advances increase efficiency of a resource, it results in an overall increase in consumption. Writing on the increased use of coal as a result of technological improvements, 19th-century economist William Stanley Jevons found that these improvements led to the development of new ways to utilize coal. In his session at 19th Cloud Expo, Mark Thiele, Chief Strategy Officer for Apcera, compared the Jevons Paradox to modern-day enterprise IT, examining how the Internet and the cloud has allowed for the democratization of IT, resulting in an increased demand for the cloud and the drive to develop new ways to utilize it.
Kubernetes is a new and revolutionary open-sourced system for managing containers across multiple hosts in a cluster. Ansible is a simple IT automation tool for just about any requirement for reproducible environments. In his session at @DevOpsSummit at 18th Cloud Expo, Patrick Galbraith, a principal engineer at HPE, discussed how to build a fully functional Kubernetes cluster on a number of virtual machines or bare-metal hosts. Also included will be a brief demonstration of running a Galera MySQL cluster as a Kubernetes application.