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Application Monitoring with @Chef | @DevOpsSummit #DevOps #Microservices

Chef supports a variety of use-cases in the enterprise and as such comes with a wide array of concepts and tools

In a previous article, I demonstrated how to effectively and efficiently install the Dynatrace Application Monitoring solution using Ansible. In this post, I am going to explain how to achieve the same results using Chef with our official dynatrace cookbook available on GitHub and on the Chef Supermarket. In the following hands-on tutorial, we'll also apply what we see as good practice on working with and extending our deployment automation blueprints to suit your needs.

Introduction to Chef
Chef supports a variety of use-cases in the enterprise and as such comes with a wide array of concepts and tools you'll need to understand before you begin. First, I want to provide sufficient background for you to get our solution up and running in minutes - even if you are new to Chef.

Client-Server vs. Standalone
Chef can be run in only two modes: client-server or standalone. In the client-server mode (aka. agent-based), the (potentially highly-available) Chef server holds and distributes node configurations, policies and associated resources to all nodes under management, where they are enforced by periodically executing chef-client processes.

Using Chef in a client-server model (agent-based)

In standalone mode (in the absence of a Chef server), configurations, policies and resources must be made available on each node and are applied by executing chef-solo. The knife tool, especially in combination with knife-solo, greatly simplifies the bootstrapping and management of Chef nodes from a single provisioner machine, and can also handle cookbook executions via chef-solo on remote machines:

Using Chef in a standalone model (agentless)

Concept #1: Cookbooks
A cookbook serves a defined scenario and contains everything (attributes, recipes, resources, etc.) that's required to support this particular scenario. Examples are mysql, postgresql and roughly 2,500 more shared on the Chef Supermarket.

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More Stories By Martin Etmajer

Leveraging his outstanding technical skills as a lead software engineer, Martin Etmajer has been a key contributor to a number of large-scale systems across a range of industries. He is as passionate about great software as he is about applying Lean Startup principles to the development of products that customers love.

Martin is a life-long learner who frequently speaks at international conferences and meet-ups. When not spending time with family, he enjoys swimming and Yoga. He holds a master's degree in Computer Engineering from the Vienna University of Technology, Austria, with a focus on dependable distributed real-time systems.

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