Welcome!

@DevOpsSummit Authors: Zakia Bouachraoui, Pat Romanski, Liz McMillan, Elizabeth White, Yeshim Deniz

Related Topics: @DevOpsSummit, Microservices Expo, Containers Expo Blog

@DevOpsSummit: Blog Feed Post

2017 #DevOps Predictions | @DevOpsSummit #CD #ML #APM #Monitoring

We sat down with three XebiaLabs thought leaders and asked what they think the future has in store for the DevOps world

Eight Predictions for DevOps in 2017
By Divesh Rupani

As 2016 approaches its end, the time to prepare for the year ahead is now! Following our own advice, we sat down with three XebiaLabs thought leaders – Andrew Phillips, Tim Buntel, and TJ Randall – and asked what they think the future has in store for the DevOps world.


2017

1. A new wave of “next gen platform” projects is coming.
In 2017, we’ll see a new wave of “next gen platform” projects focused on container orchestration frameworks such as Kubernetes, and re-tooled PaaS platforms such as OpenShift or Cloud Foundry. Acceptance of the need for a cross-machine resource management and scheduling framework is growing, and the vendor ecosystem is rapidly throwing weight behind this movement. There will also be an increased shift away from defining containers directly, and more towards having containers generated automatically where necessary.

Andrew Phillips, VP DevOps Strategy

2. Defining applications as a set of related processes will be a new de-facto standard.
We’ll stop defining many apps as essentially “virtual machines definitions,” signaling the beginning of the end of the “bake a new AMI for each app version” approach to software delivery.

-Andrew Phillips, VP DevOps Strategy

3. Efforts to address enterprise concerns will increase.
With increased experience of actually implementing next gen platforms and automatically generating  containers (see #1), there will be greater focus on enterprise concerns, such as access controls, audit trails and network technologies that can implement “virtual firewalls” at the level of the orchestration tier. We’ll also start seeing the first wave of “it’s much harder than it looks” cases.

Andrew Phillips, VP DevOps Strategy

4. More projects will have an explicit data science/big data component.
The number of data science/big data projects will increase and will have their own specific challenges around testing, Continuous Integration and Continuous Delivery. Greater business focus on these projects will reinforce the adoption of cluster managers, since most big data frameworks run on one of these.

Andrew Phillips, VP DevOps Strategy

5. Analytics and monitoring in software development will become more important.
Automated processes produce large amounts of data (just like in IoT), and we’re automating software releases more and more. Critical information needed to manage releases is being produced in large volume and scattered over a vast array of tools. Teams will need to be able to summarize that data clearly for business reporting, and identify and highlight unusual or surprising data for further investigation related to operations, usage, what’s working/what’s not.

Tim Buntel, VP of Products

6. Use of Serverless Architectures will expand.
Serverless architectures let you run code without provisioning or managing servers, which goes beyond the original promises of PaaS that we have been hearing for years. You don’t need a provisioned server, and you don’t need an application running all the time. They also provide great horizontal scalability completely automatically. While not new (AWS Lambda was launched in late 2014, for example), next year, we’ll start to see them being used more broadly, and not just as an interesting subject for a Meetup talk.

Tim Buntel, VP of Products

7. Enterprises will invest more in moving apps onto new architectures.
The organizational gaps between Legacy (aka “Mature”), Transitioning and Modern application stacks will continue to create stress for companies in areas such as hiring, staff allocation and budgeting. With an increasing number of organizations succeeding at delivering customer-facing solutions on new platforms—for example, cloud and containers—companies will invest more in moving their applications onto these new architectures.

TJ Randall, VP of Customer Success

8. Companies will continue to mash Agile-initiatives with Waterfall delivery patterns.
Pipeline and release orchestration will be the two hottest buzzwords for the non-Dev folks in the application delivery process, as these approaches provide the consistency in the delivery process that business demands, along with the flexibility that IT teams need to deliver solutions faster.

TJ Randall, VP of Customer Success

Benjamin Franklin once said, “By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.” 2017 will be another year of great change in our industry, are you ready?

We want to hear your 2017 predictions! Tweet us at @XebiaLabs or leave them in the comment section below.

The post 8 Predictions for DevOps in 2017 appeared first on XebiaLabs.

More Stories By XebiaLabs Blog

XebiaLabs is the technology leader for automation software for DevOps and Continuous Delivery. It focuses on helping companies accelerate the delivery of new software in the most efficient manner. Its products are simple to use, quick to implement, and provide robust enterprise technology.

@DevOpsSummit Stories
The current environment of Continuous Disruption requires companies to transform how they work and how they engineer their products. Transformations are notoriously hard to execute, yet many companies have succeeded. What can we learn from them? Can we produce a blueprint for a transformation? This presentation will cover several distinct approaches that companies take to achieve transformation. Each approach utilizes different levers and comes with its own advantages, tradeoffs, costs, risks, and outcomes.
Contino is a global technical consultancy that helps highly-regulated enterprises transform faster, modernizing their way of working through DevOps and cloud computing. They focus on building capability and assisting our clients to in-source strategic technology capability so they get to market quickly and build their own innovation engine.
DevOpsSUMMIT at CloudEXPO will expand the DevOps community, enable a wide sharing of knowledge, and educate delegates and technology providers alike. Recent research has shown that DevOps dramatically reduces development time, the amount of enterprise IT professionals put out fires, and support time generally. Time spent on infrastructure development is significantly increased, and DevOps practitioners report more software releases and higher quality. Sponsors of DevOpsSUMMIT at CloudEXPO will benefit from unmatched branding, profile building and lead generation opportunities.
You want to start your DevOps journey but where do you begin? Do you say DevOps loudly 5 times while looking in the mirror and it suddenly appears? Do you hire someone? Do you upskill your existing team? Here are some tips to help support your DevOps transformation. Conor Delanbanque has been involved with building & scaling teams in the DevOps space globally. He is the Head of DevOps Practice at MThree Consulting, a global technology consultancy. Conor founded the Future of DevOps Thought Leaders Debate. He regularly supports and sponsors Meetup groups such as DevOpsNYC and DockerNYC.
Modern software design has fundamentally changed how we manage applications, causing many to turn to containers as the new virtual machine for resource management. As container adoption grows beyond stateless applications to stateful workloads, the need for persistent storage is foundational - something customers routinely cite as a top pain point. In his session at @DevOpsSummit at 21st Cloud Expo, Bill Borsari, Head of Systems Engineering at Datera, explored how organizations can reap the benefits of the cloud without losing performance as containers become the new paradigm.