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Use the technology and cultural change to bring developers into the fold of the business through better collaboration

I recently had a conversation with Jennifer Lent from TechTarget. She's a respected thinker in our field and covers major trends. We spoke about the emergence of BizDevOps and its implications for businesses.

We tackled a number of topics. She wrote about our conversation in a recent article, "BizDevOps: Here's how to make it happen in your organization."

Since our conversation, I've been thinking more about BizDevOps, its challenges, and what makes the BizDevOps pipeline flow.

Peter Drucker made the prescient statement that "Culture eats strategy for breakfast." This applies to BizDevOps - changing tech is not hard, but changing culture is. You can buy the tools and put the processes into place, but getting team buy-in and creating the cultural shift to make BizDevOps run are not easy tasks.

This type of change requires leadership commitment, communication, and education. Everyone needs to be educated about the extent of the pain caused by lack of collaboration, smooth processes, and visibility in software development processes. The pain affects individuals and the business.

Each team needs to understand the challenges of other teams involved in the processes and cultivate empathy, so collaboration will be natural. To help spread the change, hire people who grasp digitization and are willing to advocate and adapt to different ways of approaching development.

Your people will gravitate to the shift as they understand the benefits of BizDevOps on a personal level and see that their harder tasks will become easier to complete once they are collaborating better.

They'll feel the difference as processes move more smoothly, problems are averted, and they're unburdened from many cumbersome tasks. Let's remember too that everyone involved in embracing and driving the change must be supported, encouraged, and rewarded.

All parties involved from management to entry-level staff need to understand that while "culture eats strategy for breakfast," the good news is that once that cultural shift is made, the entire company will function more effectively to benefit all.

Along with initiating the cultural shift, it's wise to invest in proving the concept - seeing is believing.

Proof-of-concept requires the right tools. BizDevOps is gaining interest because tools and technologies exist now that can support the strategy. Business leaders see software as a value differentiator and developers as vital contributors to the long-term success of their enterprises.

How can enterprises transform their research and intellectual property into something tangible with meaningful value? They need to be able to take an idea, create value for that idea in the form of software, and then deploy it to the customer quickly.

So how do you get started and implement BizDevOps into your development and delivery pipeline? Understand your culture and start to shape it in the right direction. Help employees embrace digitization and understand the benefits of working in a BizDevOps organization.

Next, start using the technology that will drive your development processes forward.

The tools may be new, but the growth of technology has made BizDevOps possible in ways it never was before.

Use the technology and cultural change to bring developers into the fold of the business through better collaboration. They're the ones who turn your ideas into the software that sets your business apart and ultimately brings value to your organization.

Thanks again to Ms. Lent for taking the time to speak with me and stirring up a great conversation topic. To read her full article and to learn more about why BizDevOps is driving enterprise development for many successful organizations, click here.

More Stories By Flint Brenton

Mr. Flint Brenton has extensive experience building successful software companies, with a proven track record of accelerating growth through innovation and sales execution. He is currently CEO of CollabNet, a Vector Capital-owned leader in open Application Lifecycle Management (ALM). He also serves as an operating partner at Vector, advancing its position as a transformational partner to technology businesses. Mr. Brenton is a member of the Software & Services Division (SSD), and is on the board of directors for the Software & Information Industry Association (SIIA). Previously, Mr. Brenton served as president and CEO of AccelOps, a provider of IT operations analytics for cloud and virtualized infrastructures. Prior to that, he served as president and CEO of Tidal Software, a leader in application automation software. At both AccelOps and Tidal Software, Mr. Brenton more than tripled sales under his leadership while focusing both companies on disruptive product introductions. Tidal Software was later acquired by Cisco and Mr. Brenton served in follow-on capacities there, including vice president of advanced services, and senior vice president of engineering for Cisco's cloud-based Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) and Platform as a Service (PaaS) offerings. He also has held leadership positions at NetIQ, Compaq Computer Corporation, BMC Software and IBM. He received a master's in business and public management from Rice University and a Bachelor of Science degree from Mount Union College.

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