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Software Error vs Exception – In Real World Examples | @DevOpsSummit #DevOps #APM #Monitoring

As a developer, part of our challenge is trying to anticipate all the problems that could happen

Software Error vs Exception - In Real World Examples
By Matt Watson

After 15+ years of software development, I still use the words error and exception interchangeably.

But is there a difference between exceptions and errors?

I think it is best to make the distinction with some examples of errors vs exceptions.

Example #1: Dishwasher Errors
Let's use this example of a dishwasher. Both images depict a problem, or error, that happened with the dishwasher. One was clearly user error of putting in the wrong type of soap. The other was an error that the dishwasher recognized and showed an error code for this.

I think this dishwasher example perfectly sums up the difference between an error and an exception. Both of these problems were errors. The difference here is the designer and engineers designed the product to handle one of the errors. It was an exception that the engineering team knew how to detect and handle. The engineering team did not detect or handle the soap problem.

Exceptions are a type of error that is expected or known to occur.

Example #2: Software Avoiding a Car Crash
Let's take this example of a Tesla crash. The software within the car was able to detect a stopped vehicle. The software was designed to recognize this as a known problem, or as an exception to normal behavior. The car was not able to completely prevent the crash. But, the developers were able to execute special logic to slow the car down to at least minimum the effect of the problem. Exception handling logic is key to good software. As developers, we have to anticipate the types of errors that may occur and handle them properly.

tesla stopping

Example #3: ATM
When you go to an ATM to withdraw money, you expect to actually get money, right? What if you don't have any money in your account? That would be a good example of an InvalidBankBalanceException.

If the developers didn't handle this correctly, they could be handing out money to people who shouldn't be receiving it.

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Or what if the ATM itself didn't have any money? It would not be good if they deducted $100 from your account for the money you were withdrawing, but it didn't actually give you any.

20151221_061614-1024x576

How to Anticipate Application Errors
One of the keys to good software is good error and exception handling. It is a good best practice to always be on the defense as your write code. You have to pretend that everything is going to fail.

If you don't handle possible error scenarios, inevitably, they will happen and your users will have problems. Granted, some of them might be user errors and there may not be anything you can do about them. The dishwasher soap example is a good example of this. Of course, my favorite says is "if it can be null, it will be null".

Always anticipate possible exceptions and handle them properly.

public static void DoIt(string url)
{
try
{
WebClient client = new WebClient();
string response = client.DownloadString(url);
}
catch (WebException ex) when (ex.Response != null)
{
var response = ex.Response as HttpWebResponse;
Console.WriteLine("Error receiving web response. Status: " + response?.StatusCode);
}
catch (WebException ex)
{
Console.WriteLine("Error connecting to remote server: " + ex.Message);
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
Console.WriteLine("Unknown error occurred: " + ex.Message);
}
}

Be sure to check out our guide to exception handling.

Conclusion
I hope you enjoyed this real world guide to an application error vs exception. As a developer, part of our challenge is trying to anticipate all the problems that could happen. Sadly, we never can anticipate all of them. This is why all developers need a good error monitoring system.

The post Software Error vs Exception – In Real World Examples appeared first on Stackify.

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Stackify offers the only developers-friendly solution that fully integrates error and log management with application performance monitoring and management. Allowing you to easily isolate issues, identify what needs to be fixed quicker and focus your efforts – Support less, Code more. Stackify provides software developers, operations and support managers with an innovative cloud based solution that gives them DevOps insight and allows them to monitor, detect and resolve application issues before they affect the business to ensure a better end user experience. Start your free trial now stackify.com

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