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A Serverless Kubernetes?

Knative provides a set of middleware components that allow you to build container-based applications that can run anywhere

Just announced at Google Next: Knative. Knative provides a set of middleware components that allow you to build container-based applications that can run anywhere: on-premises, in the cloud, or even in a third-party data center.

What's unique about Knative is the fact that it's built on a Kubernetes-based framework that provides serverless features. Serverless systems enable developers to focus on writing code without having to worry about building, deploying, and managing an application.

Serverless computing, as the name implies, means that users don't need to deal with the concept of a virtual server, as they do within most public cloud computing systems. You focus on writing the application, and the serverless systems will automatically pick the right configuration, provision the resources, run your code, and return the resources back the way the they came. You don't provision anything; you only pay for the resources the serverless system uses, and you're abstracted from the complexity.

Knative allows you to run your serverless workloads on Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE) by enabling the serverless add-on. This serverless add-on helps developers orchestrate builds and events with a single click of the mouse.

The value of this technology is that it allows builders to build. Instead of dealing with the underlying application management and operations issues, you can focus on how the applications work. There's no longer the distraction of correctly configuring your Kubernetes instances, as well as the containers that are parts of clusters, or worrying that all of the infrastructure supporting your container-based applications are working and playing well together.

Knative is geek compliant. It focuses on a familiar development experience, supports common development platforms such as GitOps, DockerOps, ManualOps, and others, and it supports tools and frameworks such as Django, Ruby on Rails, and Spring. This means that the productivity of leveraging what's familiar does not leave when you deploy containers using serverless mechanisms.

The value of this is obvious. Container and Kubernetes developers can be more productive in a serverless world, as already proven with other serverless development environments that are supported by most public clouds. This productivity enables greater agility, meaning that applications can be changed and built more quickly and placed directly into production. There's the potential to save major money but also gain the value of agility that most businesses need to improve.

I suspect that Knative will be the way most people who build container-based systems on Kubernetes choose to leverage this technology. People have a tendency to move toward technology that offers the least amount of resistance and latency. Clearly, Knative offers a path.

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1. Source: https://cloud.google.com/knative/

Copyright © 2018 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights reserved

This article was originally published on the Deloitte On Cloud Blog and can be found here: www.deloitte.com/us/deloitte-on-cloud-blog.

More Stories By David Linthicum

David Linthicum is the Chief Cloud Strategy Officer at Deloitte Consulting, and was just named the #1 cloud influencer via a recent major report by Apollo Research. He is a cloud computing thought leader, executive, consultant, author, and speaker. He has been a CTO five times for both public and private companies, and a CEO two times in the last 25 years.

Few individuals are true giants of cloud computing, but David's achievements, reputation, and stellar leadership has earned him a lofty position within the industry. It's not just that he is a top thought leader in the cloud computing universe, but he is often the visionary that the wider media invites to offer its readers, listeners and viewers a peek inside the technology that is reshaping businesses every day.

With more than 13 books on computing, more than 5,000 published articles, more than 500 conference presentations and numerous appearances on radio and TV programs, he has spent the last 20 years leading, showing, and teaching businesses how to use resources more productively and innovate constantly. He has expanded the vision of both startups and established corporations as to what is possible and achievable.

David is a Gigaom research analyst and writes prolifically for InfoWorld as a cloud computing blogger. He also is a contributor to “IEEE Cloud Computing,” Tech Target’s SearchCloud and SearchAWS, as well as is quoted in major business publications including Forbes, Business Week, The Wall Street Journal, and the LA Times. David has appeared on NPR several times as a computing industry commentator, and does a weekly podcast on cloud computing.

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