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@DevOpsSummit Authors: Elizabeth White, Zakia Bouachraoui, Pat Romanski, Liz McMillan, AppDynamics Blog

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The Easy Way to Select a Java Web Framework

The most difficult part of writing this article was getting started. I didn’t want this article to be another taxonomy of Java web frameworks like my original article. Instead, I wanted this article to present a pragmatic way to select a framework that is easy and matches the things that you and your team find valuable to software development.

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